Thursday, 2 February 2012

SIR SAYS - EMOTIONS ARE NEVER CLICHED

SOURCE: Psych-your-mind Blogspot

My second piece of homework didn't get done.


Considering a range of suitable excuses, I was thinking of leading with "the monster ate it." He looked like one of these faces ;)

My excuse, it wasn't exactly true. 


I was thinking about this quote from Dr Seuss:


"You know you're in love when you can't fall asleep because reality is finally better than your dreams."


Reality got in the way of writing the CW short story... Reality got in the way of polishing up the short story I've already written in my notebook. The reality of writing, finishing a final and significant re-write, polishing up the query letter and sending off 4 submissions! 


Just to prove I haven't been slacking, I sent my submission to Sir!


I'm writing and loving it.


If the purpose of the Creative Writing course was to remind me that I love writing it's doing a brilliant job.



SIR SAYS:

  • identify and eliminate emotions words
  • describe emotions using specific and "concrete" terms
  • avoid clich├ęs - look for an original (and specific to your character and the setting of your novel) way to describe an emotion
  • describe all aspects of the physical sensations of emotions 

SIR SAYS NEVER USE:

  • her heart melted
  • she felt like breaking down when she read her results
  • she felt like her hear was being torn from her chest
IN A BRAINY AND INTELLECTUAL MOMENT, SIR SAYS:

  • Emotion words are abstract nouns - they are not solid and they cannot be seen.
  • There are narrow definitions for each emotion but they have broad meanings and associations. 
  • To describe an emotion you need to tap into what the emotion means to you and to your MC.



Garrick knew he'd been imprisoned in the cellar for almost a month but as his sleep pattern was irregular and he was often hungry he hadn't been able to keep track of the exact number of days. His fingers were bleeding again, and he hadn't found a brick anywhere around the barred window that he could prise out of line. He leaned his head against the wall and waited until the throbbing in his fingertips subsided so he could start to push around the bricks again.

PROFOUND THOUGHT OF THE DAY:

PEOPLE, AND CHARACTERS TOO, OFTEN USE ONE EMOTION TO MASK ANOTHER - WRITERS NEED TO LET THE HIDDEN EMOTION BLEED THROUGH

7 comments:

  1. Yes emotions through actions!

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  2. Hi Brian
    Emotions shown with a balance of cause and effect. ;)

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  3. Totally agree. Naming an emotion is a clear sign that the showing isn't strong enough, or the writer lacks confidence in their ability to describe emotion. And ditto with the word 'felt'...it's a sure sign something needs fixing to make the emotion more immediately felt, not told or explained.

    Happy Friday!

    Angela @ The Bookshelf Muse

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  4. It all goes back to "show" rather than "tell." Sir is very wise!

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  5. Hi GE
    I love bleeding emotions into situations. People often project the emotion of choice, determined to make everyone around them think they are not feeling hurt or angry.

    Hi Angela
    I totally agree. The only time where I might be more literal is when I'm writing for an MG reader. Sometimes, after painting the emotions, you do need to say - almost ironically. It keeps the readers with less processing skills up to speed with everyone else.

    Hi Sherry
    Everyone needs a little positive feedback, I'll be sure to tell him you said so ;)

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  6. Lovely post....masking is so much a part of human nature.


    Stopping by to welcome you on board the A to Z Challenge April 2012
    We shall have loads of fun exchanging comments and visits!

    Twitter: @AprilA2Z
    #atozchallenge

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